Author: Kristen Potter

MACLEA Hosts Virtual Panel Featuring Four Police Leaders from Around the Country

MACLEA Hosts Virtual Panel Featuring Four Police Leaders from Around the Country
MACLEA’s panel, hosted virtually on Thursday, May 27, featured (clockwise from top left) Holy Cross Chief Shawn de Jong, Northeastern University Director of Public Safety and Deputy Chief of Police Ruben Galindo, University of Massachusetts Amherst Police Chief Tyrone Parham, Cambridge Police Commissioner Branville G. Bard, Jr. and Marquette University Police Chief Edith Hudson. (Photo courtesy MACLEA)

The Massachusetts Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (MACLEA) is pleased to share the success of a recent virtual panel.

Coordinated by MACLEA’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee and moderated by Holy Cross Chief Shawn de Jong, the panel held on Thursday, May 27 featured Cambridge Police Commissioner Branville G. Bard, Jr., Northeastern University Director of Public Safety and Deputy Chief of Police Ruben Galindo, Marquette University Police Chief Edith Hudson and University of Massachusetts Amherst Police Chief Tyrone Parham.

The panel addressed numerous topics around improving relationships with communities, including transparency and accountability, trust, police advisory boards, recruiting and training.

Chief de Jong began the event addressing the challenges facing police departments, including college police departments. She discussed how college police officers are no longer simply security guards, but are very alike to their municipal counterparts in terms of the crimes and incidents they respond to, their training, and the importance of creating and maintaining positive relationships with their campus communities.

The panelists went on to discuss transparency and accountability and the steps their departments have taken to address these needs. Chief Parham discussed a new Accountability and Transparency website the UMass Amherst Police Department launched. The website was a product of demands for change and calls for racial justice by a student-led Racial Justice Coalition following George Floyd’s murder. Chief Parham met with the group multiple times and transparency was an important part of what they wanted from their police department. UMPD launched the site on July 20, 2020.

The panel also discussed various ways of connecting with the community and improving trust. Commissioner Bard discussed the Cambridge Police Family and Social Justice Section, which provides certain services to community members who may be better served through a social justice approach than a conventional criminal justice approach. The department’s Office of Procedural Justice also works to increase transparency and accountability by monitoring data relating to police-citizen interactions.

The panelists also discussed their work with police advisory boards. At Marquette, Chief Hudson is working with the advisory board to create new ways for community members to share feedback, which is currently under development both with the advisory board and Marquette law students. At Northeastern, the advisory board has been up and running for about a year. The board has worked with NUPD on changes to uniforms and complaint systems, and Director Galindo believes the advisory board has significantly helped the department create better relationships with some of the students who are most vocal about changes in policing.

On recruiting, Chief Hudson said in Wisconsin, recruitment in general is difficult at city and college police departments, but even more so when needing to factor in diversity recruitment. She believes the best way to recruit people is to be passionate about the work. Commissioner Bard said Cambridge has seen positive gains in recent years on minority and marginalized recruitment.

Director Galindo discussed how NUPD has started to enter a new phase of its recruitment process by looking at the internal culture of the department. The idea is that people generally want to work at a department where they feel they can enact change and be valued. In terms of diversity, he said while they strive to be a diverse department, it is much more important to find the right candidates, not just people who fit into a particular category. Chief de Jong agreed, saying that when they get to the end of a hiring phase and they look across the table at a potential recruit, they want to see a good human being before wanting to see a potentially good officer.

Another important topic discussed was approaches to training. NUPD has partnered with the Cambridge Police Department to run a regional police academy through the Municipal Police Training Committee (MPTC). Director Galindo discussed the importance of building officers’ socialization within the community starting on day one of training. One of the assignments at the academy includes talking to students, seeing what they may need and following up as necessary. He believes that interactions with people during a response should first and foremost be looked at as an opportunity to learn about their story and their needs.

The panelists wrapped up by discussing the future of campus policing and their hopes for their individual legacies.

“We were thrilled to be able to host this panel and I would like to commend Chiefs de Jong and Parham for their work on MACLEA’s DEI Committee to plan this event,” said Capt. Andrew Turco, MACLEA president and captain at the MIT Police Department. “I would also like to extend my gratitude and appreciation to Commissioner Bard, Director Galindo, Chief Hudson and Chief Parham for taking time out of their day to join us and share their tremendous insight and experiences.”

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MACLEA Announces Panel on Transparency, Trust Between Police and Communities

MACLEA Announces Panel on Transparency, Trust Between Police and Communities

MACLEA Announces Panel on Transparency, Trust Between Police and Communities

MASSACHUSETTS — The Massachusetts Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (MACLEA) is pleased to announce a virtual panel to take place next week.

The panel, entitled “Dynamic Leadership: Redefining Transparency and Trust,” will take place virtually on Thursday, May 27 from 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. The panel is open to members of the association’s member departments, as well as faculty and staff from colleges and universities across the Commonwealth.

The event will feature four police leaders discussing ways in which their departments have worked to improve relationships with their communities. Topics will include citizen advisory groups, transparency and accountability, hiring practices, increasing diversity within police departments and alternative response models.

The panelists will discuss their respective departments’ work in these areas and attendees will be able to ask questions.

“In a time when the policing profession continues to be under close attention, it is important for police departments to commit to engaging with those they serve in a meaningful way,” said Capt. Andrew Turco, MACLEA president and captain at the MIT Police Department. “The four panelists have valuable experience leading police departments and putting forth initiatives to help build and maintain positive relationships with their communities, and we encourage our members to attend.”

Those who wish to attend are asked to RSVP to the event by clicking here.

Panelists will include:

Cambridge Police Commissioner Branville G. Bard, Jr.
Commissioner Bard was appointed police commissioner for the City of Cambridge Police Department in August 2017. He joined the department after serving as chief of police and director of public safety for the Philadelphia Housing Authority’s Police Department. Under his leadership at the fourth largest Housing Authority in the country, significant crime reductions were realized and relations drastically improved between Housing Authority residents and the police, while citizen complaints declined and a defunct Police Advisory Board was reestablished.

He had previously served in numerous positions with the Philadelphia Police Department, including Police Inspector, and Police Captain for the 22nd District which is the largest police district in the city for assigned personnel. There, the District piloted many crime-reduction strategies, including Philadelphia CeaseFire Cure Violence, data-driven efforts, Summer Foot Beat Initiative, Focused Deterrence Policing and Intelligence-led policing efforts.

Northeastern University Director of Public Safety and Deputy Chief of Police Ruben Galindo
Director Galindo joined the NUPD in January 2015 as the deputy chief of police, leading all police operations, and was later promoted to director of public safety. He began his career with the Miami-Dade Police Department in 1982, attaining several ranks during his tenure. Some of his commands included Captain of the Liberty City District, Commander of the Miami International Airport and Director of the Miami-Dade Training Institute.

The NUPD is a full-service police department with over 100 employees, more than 70 of which are sworn law enforcement officers. The department is accredited through the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) and through the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission (MPAC). The department has also partnered with the Cambridge Police Department to run its own police academy through the Municipal Police Training Committee (MPTC).

Marquette University Police Chief Edith Hudson
Chief Hudson leads over 80 public safety professionals of the Marquette University Police Department. She is the former assistant chief of police for the Milwaukee Police Department, serving for 25 years in progressive leadership roles before her retirement from the department in 2015.

Chief Hudson is a current board member of NAMI Greater Milwaukee; an active member of Alverno College’s vanguard society, a group of professional women who provide mentorship and other support to alumna, current students and administration; and serves as co-chair of the Near West Side Partners safety working group. She has also been involved in the Alverno College’s Servant Leadership Roundtable for several years.

University of Massachusetts Amherst Police Chief Tyrone Parham
Chief Parham was named to the position of assistant vice chancellor/chief of police at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in January 2016. He oversees 62 sworn officers on a college campus consisting of over 30,000 students and 51 residence halls. UMass Amherst PD is a full-service police department that is accredited through CALEA and MPAC.

Parham joined the Pennsylvania State University Police Department in 1989 as a student security officer. In 1993 he was hired as a patrol officer and rose through the ranks, holding the positions of detective, lieutenant, assistant chief and deputy chief before his appointment as chief. From 2011-2016, Chief Parham served as chief of police at Penn State. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy Class #244 and PERF’s Senior Management Institute for Police Class #68.

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